Thursday, May 12, 2016

48 Hours in Slovenia : Ljubljana

I left off earlier this week with part 1 of my time in Slovenia. I talked all about Bled & you can find that post here. Today I'm linking up with Amanda to share Part 2.


After our morning at the castle & snagging some incredible shots of the lake below, we were off to Ljubljana (Lube-lee-on-uh) for the afternoon.

Ljubljana is the capital of Slovenia & the largest city in the country. Even so, the population clocks in at ~300,000 people, giving it a small town feel. Streets are super walkable & the old town portion of Ljubljana is car free. Austrian style architecture lines the city & when we showed up mid-day on Saturday, things were bustling. 


We walked through the old town, stopping inside Ljubljana Cathedral, before getting some time to explore on our own.




I immediately took off to explore the farmers market. I tasted my fair share of wines, olive oils & bread before grabbing a sandwich for lunch & heading to the highest building in the city, Crystal Palace. I was able to take the elevator to the 20th floor. There's a small cafe & observation deck overlooking the city & Ljubljana Castle. I knew I wouldn't have time to see the castle, nor would going to the castle award me a view of the castle. So Crystal Palace it was.


I enjoyed some gelato as I poked my head into the local shops & strolled the streets.



I ended with some people watching before it was time to head back to Bled.


I snagged a bike from a local rental place & went for a few loops around Bled Lake. While my skinny jeans weren't ideal biking apparel, it worked & I got some more great shots of the lake before heading to Panorama Restaurant for dinner. True to it's name, the place had great views (& average food).



I'll have another travel recap next week. So far I've been recapping in reverse order, since I got to those pictures first, but who knows what city I'll recap next. But, no, seriously. Who knows? I haven't started writing yet.

Have you & your SO done the whole lock on a bridge thing?
What's your ideal city size, big, small, in the middle?
Car free capital...do any cities in the US have large car free areas?

7 comments:

  1. So cool to see a town via bike.
    I love the lock thing but it freaks me out when they say how it weighs a bridge down when they get so overloaded. YIKES.

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  2. what a beautiful day to explore the city! great idea getting the bikes to make quick work of traveling. im totally doing the lock bridge when we go to paris but we have never done it anywhere else. I like car free cities like venice but i dont think its really practical in the US since its so big

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  3. Wow, those are some seriously beautiful structures. Getting bikes in Europe is really fun! :-)))

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  4. This looks so beautiful! Oh man I feel ya on biking in jeans. We went to Door County, Wisconsin a few years ago and I was not in proper attire to be biking in the muggy, buggy weather haha.

    I love car-free cities. We go to Chicago quite a bit and once we get in town I like to park my car and not touch it until it's time to leave. Uber all the way. Or walking.

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  5. Is that a giant green bounce house out the front of that building? The architecture looks absolutely incredible and I love that you explored the city via bike!

    I'm defintiely an in the middle girl when it comes to city size. Not too big that it's hectic but not too small that there's nothing to do either!

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  6. So gorgeous! Ugh every time someone shares a trip they went on I add another city to my wish list. This looks absolutely amazing! I'm not particular about big or small cities..they both have their benefits so I'll see them both :)

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  7. AHHHH I WANT TO GO!!! So beautiful!

    A car-free city is like my dream. But our culture is too in love with cars for that to ever happen in the US.

    I like small-big cities. I'm definitely a city girl, but cities like NYC and Chicago are too big and impersonal for me. I like Milwaukee's size. Big enough to have culture and be a city but small enough to feel homey.

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